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Pickled Cucumber

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pickled cucumber (commonly known as a pickle in Australia, Canada, and the United States or generically as gherkins in the UK) is a cucumber that has been pickled in a brine, vinegar, or other solution and left to ferment for a period of time, by either immersing the cucumbers in an acidic solution or through souring by lacto-fermentation.

Gherkin

A gherkin is not only a pickle of a certain size but also a particular species of cucumber: the West Indian or Burr Gherkin (Cucumis anguria), which produces a somewhat smaller fruit than the garden cucumber (Cucumis sativus).[1] Standard pickles are made from the Burr Gherkin, but the term gherkin has become loosely used as any small cucumber pickled in a vinegar brine, regardless of the variety of cucumber used.

Cornichon

Cornichons are tart French pickles made from small gherkins pickled in vinegar and tarragon. They traditionally accompany pâtés.[2]

Brined pickles

10th Annual New York City International Pickle Day festival in 2010.

Brined pickles are prepared using the traditional process of natural fermentation in a brine which makes them grow sour. The brine concentration can vary between 20 g/litre to more than 40 g/litre of salt. There is no vinegar used in the brine of naturally fermented pickled cucumbers.

The fermentation process is entirely dependent on the naturally occurring Lactobacillus bacteria that normally cover the skin of a growing cucumber. Since these are routinely removed during commercial harvesting/packing processes, traditionally prepared pickles can only be made from freshly harvested cucumbers, unless the bacteria are artificially replaced.

Typically, small cucumbers are placed in a glass or ceramic vessel or a wooden barrel, together with a variety of spices. Among those traditionally used in many recipes are garlic, horseradish, whole dill stems with umbels and green seeds, white mustard seeds, grape, oak, cherry, blackcurrant and bay laurel leaves, dried allspice fruits, and—most importantly—salt. The container is then filled with cooled, boiled water and kept under a non-airtight cover (often cloth tied on with string or a rubber band) for several weeks, depending on taste and external temperature. Traditionally stones, also sterilized by boiling, are placed on top of the cucumbers to keep them under the water. The more salt is added the more sour the cucumbers become.

Since they are produced without vinegar, a film of bacteria forms on the top, but this does not indicate they have spoiled, and the film is simply removed. They do not, however, keep as long as cucumbers pickled with vinegar, and usually must be refrigerated. Some commercial manufacturers add vinegar as a preservative.

Kosher dill (US)

A "kosher" dill pickle is not necessarily kosher in the sense that it has been prepared under rabbinical supervision. Rather, it is a pickle made in the traditional manner of Jewish New York City pickle makers, with generous addition of garlic and dill weed to a natural salt brine.[3][4][5]

Whereas in Germany and Poland dill pickles have been prepared for hundreds of years, in the US at least one New York restaurant was serving dill pickles in the nineteenth century.[6]

In New York terminology, a "full-sour" kosher dill is one that has fully fermented, while a "half-sour," given a shorter stay in the brine, is still crisp and bright green.[7] Elsewhere, these pickles may sometimes be termed "old' and "new" dills.

Polish

Polish "ogórek kiszony"

The Polish-style pickled cucumber (Polish: ogórek kiszony/kwaszony; slang: kiszeniak) is a variety developed in the northern parts of Europe. It has been exported worldwide and is found in the cuisines of many countries. It is sour, similar to kosher dills, but tends to be seasoned differently[citation needed]. It is usually preserved in wooden barrels. A cucumber only pickled for a few days is different in taste (less sour) than one pickled for a longer time and is called ogórek małosolny, which literally means 'little salt cucumber'. This distinction is similar to the one between half- and full-sour types of kosher dills (see above).

Another kind of pickled cucumber, popular in Poland, is ogórek konserwowy ('preserved cucumber') which is rather sweet and vinegary in taste, due to different composition of the preserving solution. It is kept in jars instead of barrels or cans.

Hungarian

In Hungary, while regular vinegar-pickled cucumbers (Hungarian: savanyú uborka) are made during most of the year, during the summer kovászos uborka ("leavened pickles") are made without the use of vinegar. Cucumbers are placed in a glass vessel along with spices (usually dill and garlic), water and salt. Additionally, a slice or two of bread are placed at the top and bottom of the solution, and the container is left to sit in the sun for a few days so the yeast in the bread can help cause a fermentation process.[8]

Lime

Lime pickles are soaked in lime rather than in a salt brine.[9] This is done more to enhance texture (by making them crisper) rather than as a preservative. The lime is then rinsed off the pickles. Vinegar and sugar are often added after the 24-hour soak in lime, along with pickling spices.

Bread and butter

A jar of bread-and-butter pickles

Bread-and-butter pickles are sweeter in flavor than dill pickles, having a high concentration of sugar or other sweetener added to the brine. Rather than being served alongside a sandwich,[citation needed] they are more often used in fully flavored sandwiches,[citation needed] such as hamburgers, or used in potato salad. Cucumbers to be made into bread and butters are often sliced before pickling.

Swedish and Danish

Swedish pickled cucumbers (pressgurka) are thinly sliced, mixed with salt and pressed to drain some water from the cucumber slices. Afterwards placed in a jar with a sour-sweet brine of vinegar, sugar, dill and mustard seeds.

Danish cucumber salad (agurkesalat) is similar, but the cucumbers are not pressed and the brine doesn't have parsley. The cucumber salad accompanies meat dishes, especially a roasted chicken dish (gammeldags kylling med agurkesalat), and is used on Danish hot dogs.

Kool-Aid pickles

Kool-Aid pickles or "koolickles", enjoyed by children in parts of the Southern United States,[10] are created by soaking dill pickles in a mixture of Kool-Aid and pickle brine.

Nutrition

Like pickled vegetables such as sauerkraut, sour pickled cucumbers (technically a fruit) are low in calories. They also contain a moderate amount of vitamin K, specifically in the form of K1. One sour pickled cucumber "spear" offers 12–16 µg, or approximately 15–20%, of the Recommended Daily Allowance of vitamin K. It also offers three kilocalories, most of which come from carbohydrate.[11] However, most sour pickled cucumbers are also high in sodium; one spear can contain 350–500 mg, or 15–20% of the American recommended daily limit of 2400 mg.[12]

Sweet pickled cucumbers, including bread-and-butter pickles, are higher in calories due to their sugar content; one large gherkin may contain 20-30 calories. However, sweet pickled cucumbers also tend to contain significantly less sodium than sour pickles.[13]

Serving

A breaded pickle
Fried pickles

In the United States, pickles are often served as a side dish accompanying meals. This often takes the form of a "pickle spear", which is a pickled cucumber cut length-wise into quarters or sixths. Pickles may be used as a condiment on a hamburger or other sandwich (usually in slice form), or on a sausage or hot dog in chopped form as pickle relish.

Soured cucumbers are commonly used in a variety of dishes—for example, pickle-stuffed meatloaf,[14] potato salad or chicken salad—or consumed alone as an appetizer.

Pickles are sometimes served alone as festival foods, often on a stick. This is also done in Japan, where it is referred to as "stick pickle" (一本漬 ippon-tsuke?).

Dill pickles can be fried, typically deep-fried with a breading or batter surrounding the spear or slice. This is a popular dish in the Southern U.S., and a rising trend elsewhere in the US.[15]

Pickle etymology

The term pickle is derived from the Dutch word pekel, meaning brine. In the U.S. and Canada, the word pickle alone almost always refers to a pickled cucumber (other types of pickles will be described as "pickled onion," "pickled beets," etc.). In the UK pickle generally refers to ploughman's pickle, such as Branston pickle, traditionally served with a Ploughman's lunch.

Last Updated on Tuesday, 16 September 2014 10:40
 

About this site..

Welcome to Version 2.0 of Mangalorean Recipes. 

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This website makes an attempt to offer you recipes primarily from Mangalore, who originally migrated from Goa. So we have very many similarities.

Our mothers and grand mothers perfected Mangalorean cooking. However, the memory of the taste of these foods they prepared is fast being forgotten with new trends in the food industry,

For those, who are enterprising and interested in trying a variety of dishes, and those who are longing for their home food, this site may prove useful.

Being a Catholic brought up in that milieu, I have absorbed many values, which I like to share with those with similar interests.   I believe, the food is needed for the growth of the body, but there is also a spirit within us, which needs sustenance.   I wish to share the unique gift of music, which I have dedicated to my Maker,  and added it under the component: Catholic Church Music which can be freely used by our visitors, if they like it.

I have also included a Text Book to learn Music, and its script.   One generally does not realize its importance, with the modern recording and play back tools that are available.   But not all music is recorded, and the older music, is retained in the memory, and some have been good enough to write it in notation, which is the only way, to render music which is two dimensional, i.e. it is based on time and tonal pitch.   The lyrics can be written in spoken languages, but the music can not be. That is why, through a process of trial and error, the script was developed over 8 centuries, and the greatest of music that has come from the human mind, is available only in this form.

Thus the whole reason of this website, is to share what we have with others.   What we received from our ancestors, and which they gave us, because of their love for their children, we should also pass it on to the next generation.   I hope this tradition of sharing will go on, as years roll by and old faces disappear from the scene.

I would appreciate any feedback so please feel free to email me. Also I would like it if you gave your comments about the recipes and music on this site. Most recipes and music pages allow you to post your comments. So if you've had a chance to try the recipes or listen to the music, I would love to hear from you.

Thank You.

Walter Pais

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